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Maxim
12-02-04, 08:38 PM
Hello!

My name is Maxim Safronov. I live in Russia and I make custom knives. You are welcome to visit my web site at www.MaximKnives.com

Though my knives are intensely decorated they are first of all practical knives for practical purposes. They are also very well suitable for collection. Any questions and comments are welcome at my e-mail address (see it on my web site).

If you are interested to order something from me but hesitating for some reason I can provide you with contact details of my regular customers in the UK. Or you can buy some of my knives via eBay. Request by email, please.

Danzo
13-02-04, 12:41 AM
Hi Maxim and a big welcome to you!

:biggthump

You have some very interesting knives! I hope we can build some valuable contacts with you and other knife makers in Russia.

Do you know Sergey from;

www.rusartknife.urbannet.ru

The knife exhibition in Moscow looks amazing!

:approve:

Danzo

Tantalus
20-02-04, 05:11 PM
ooooooooh lots of nice shiny and sharp things :wow:

just out of interest could you tell me more about birch bark handles?
how they are made and how they stand up to getting wet ? - gotta love the british climate :rolleyes:

we have 2 seasons winter and july, in july it rains a lot :umbrella:

and while im asking questions i might as well ask about the bog oak tanto style knife too

# F-17. on http://user.rol.ru/~knives/fight.htm

rough price for a shorter version say maybe 200 mm blade ?

decorative purposes only of course :D

cheers
Tant

Maxim
20-02-04, 08:19 PM
> just out of interest could you tell me more about birch bark handles?
> how they are made and how they stand up to getting wet ? - gotta love the british climate :rolleyes:

Handles: Birch bark handles are highly valued in Russia and the Nordic countries though less known in the rest of Europe and the USA. They are good for any kind of climate. The combination of birch bark and duralumin make the handle feel ‘warm’ in cold weather. Also these knives are usually 2-3 oz lighter than the analogous knives with brass or stainless steel guards and butt-caps. It is very important when you have to walk hours in hunting, especially in deep snow. Besides, a birch bark handle does not slip away from a greasy, oily or soapy hand. It is very important when you skin animals or cut fish. Birch bark handle does not absorb water. You just need to wash the handle with a soap to make it look like new, and several moves with micro sand paper will make it look actually new. No coating is necessary, it always feels slightly velvety. Birch bark is also considered to be healing wounds (obviously not of the animal being skinned). The birch bark handle is made this way: you cut from 150 to 200 birch bark pieces, get each cleaned, dried for days, sandpapered, glued to each other, mounted, pressed with several hundred kilos for days, dried again for days, and then mounted onto a tang and fixed with the butt-cap, then you shape and engrave the handle. It is long and laborious process. Yet birch bark handle is the centuries proved choice of Russia and the Nordic countries. Most handles are made this way inside: long, about inch wide and thick tang is inserted into a titanium or stainless steel rod and fixed to it with stainless steel rivets. Butt-cap is screwed onto the rod. [/B]

> we have 2 seasons winter and july, in july it rains a lot :umbrella:
== That sounds good. Some people say we also have two seasons in Russia: a white winter and the green one.

> and while im asking questions i might as well ask about the bog oak tanto style knife too

> decorative purposes only of course :D
[B]== forged, vacuum hardened 440C and D2 blades with hardness of 60 HRC are very good for decorative purposes in the right moment. I mean it seems to me very aesthetic to once in a while contemplate tanto blade etchings on a gloomy and rainy days in UK in July.

Tantalus
20-02-04, 09:55 PM
sorry maxim for not being more specific

i had actually read that page, and found it very interesting too

my question was really more aimed at trying it myself

how much of the bark do i take? all of it right down to the wood?

2-3 days drying time or more like 2-3 months? can i do this in an oven or is a warm place in the kitchen better?

what kind of glue?

does it hold together on its own once it is finished or does it need the buttcap to help?

you did say its traditional so i dont feel like im trying to steal any trade secrets

it just sounds like something that would keep me out of mischief for a while

thanks
Tant

Maxim
26-02-04, 12:16 AM
> how much of the bark do i take? all of it right down to the wood? 2-3 days drying time or more like 2-3 months? can i do this in an oven or is a warm place in the kitchen better?

== You should take only the outer layer (not to the wood). Its thickness may vary 0,5-2 mm. How thick is that layer and how long you should dry it depends on what kind of birch bark it is, whether it is a young tree or an old one and if it grew on a hill or in a swamp. The birch bark also changes in seasons. Drying duration depends on the ambient humidity as well. I think I can give you a very basic guidance here on how to make a birch bark handle and then you will learn more from your experience. Sometimes the operations can be different and the stages can change places. I cannot explain all nuances here.

-Take enough pieces of white birch bark from birch tree logs.
-Cut square or rectangular birch bark pieces. Say, 2"x2.5".
-On this stage you may choose to make holes for the tang in the birch bark pieces. Or you may choose to make the hole later in the pile of glued birch bark pieces.
-Pile the birch bark pieces together, white sides turned to the same direction. Make a pile of about 6'' high.
-Fix the pile with rubber strings from falling apart.
-Let the pile dry. (Or you may choose to let the birch bark pieces dry separately and pile them later).
-Drying time of 2-3 months or more is good, that is what we do, but a week in a dry warm place in a kitchen may be quite all right as well.
-Clean each birch bark piece with sand paper from scaling off parts.
-Pile the birch bark pieces again and glue them to each other with some glue that is ok for contacting with food, or you may choose not to use glue at all if you plan to extra strongly press the pile later. Or you may choose to use polyvinyl acetate glue.
-Make a hole in the pile for a tang unless it has been done before.
-Mount the pile onto a shaft threaded at both ends and compress the pile with plates and screw-nuts and let it dry again. The pile can be compressed from 6'' high to only 4" high.
-Unmount the compressed pile from the shaft and mount it onto the tang with threaded end and screw up the butt-cap.
-Shape the handle with whatever tools you have.

I can send pictures to those who are interested. Ask me by email.


> you did say its traditional so i dont feel like im trying to steal any trade secrets

== The secrets are in experience. It is an experience that tells you what birch bark to use, when it is not dry yet or when it is over-dried, which glue to use or not to use and how strongly press the pile or not to press it. In any case it is a very time consuming process and you just cannot make good birch bark handle cheap. If I made my knives in Europe they would turn out several times more expensive. Yet I think it is not a problem to make a good birch bark handle provided one can spend enough time and accuracy to it.

As for the secrets at large, they are mostly in experience as I said. The secrets are in nuances the knowledge of which come with experience. It is like you do not think of your native language grammar when you just speak it. As I make new type of knives every day I have to accomplish new tasks every day. It is very different from producing serial knives. It gives me some experience.

Tantalus
26-02-04, 01:35 AM
Thanks Maxim

it is difficult to picture the handle never having seen or touched one
your comments are perfect and help me understand better

Im itching to try it out

:thanks:
:)

Tant

loko
30-01-09, 11:39 AM
hello maxim
you have some very beautiful cutlery on display. i like how you pay a lot of attention to details..

and i completely fell in love with this blade... i just have no idea what to use it for.. it's just too big :D
http://www.maximknives.com/2008/d-126safronov-14.jpg

Mike Bowler
30-01-09, 12:22 PM
Hello and welcome to BB Maxim I like your knives very nice sir
Will have to save up for one

ZDP-189
30-01-09, 01:17 PM
Maxim, welcome. Be advised that it is illegal to offer for sale knives in the UK that are explicitly marketed as suitable as weapons.

benp1
30-01-09, 01:23 PM
:D

Maxim posted in 2004!

aksnc30
30-01-09, 01:53 PM
beautiful knives - as well as functional :D

this made me chuckle :D good sense of humour


...Birch bark is also considered to be healing wounds (obviously not of the animal being skinned).

this is my favourite
http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb184/aksnc30/d-110safronov-01.jpg

or possibly this one - i think my wallet is having a panic attack again :(
http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb184/aksnc30/d-80safronov2006-3.jpg

loko
30-01-09, 02:11 PM
:D

Maxim posted in 2004!

heck yeah.. lol.. how come the thread showed up today?

Danzo
30-01-09, 02:56 PM
heck yeah.. lol.. how come the thread showed up today?

Because you posted in it!

:rolleyes:

Danzo

Noddy
30-01-09, 03:01 PM
:lol: zombi thread :D:D

loko
30-01-09, 03:07 PM
Because you posted in it!

:rolleyes:

Danzo

right... :P


but i got to the thread by clicking the "previous thread" link at the bottom.. and NO i didn't warp time back to 2004 8)

ZDP-189
30-01-09, 03:19 PM
Maxim, welcome. Be advised that it is illegal to offer for sale knives in the UK that are explicitly marketed as suitable as weapons.
:D

Maxim posted in 2004!

Yeah, that's why I didn't rename the thread and issue a warning.

Moonz
30-01-09, 05:17 PM
Almost 5 years has to be a record in thread necromancy...hasn't it? :huh:

:D

ugug
31-01-09, 02:36 PM
..only in the virtual world :yuck:

Maxim
05-02-09, 11:19 AM
Maxim, welcome. Be advised that it is illegal to offer for sale knives in the UK that are explicitly marketed as suitable as weapons.

Please excuse my English. Would you please change 'Bladed W-ry' into 'Knives' in the title of the topic? I meant to offer only hunting tools and collectable bladed items for the UK audience.

Thank you,
Maxim.
************

Maxim
05-02-09, 11:28 AM
hello maxim
you have some very beautiful cutlery on display. i like how you pay a lot of attention to details..

and i completely fell in love with this blade... i just have no idea what to use it for.. it's just too big :D
http://www.maximknives.com/2008/d-126safronov-14.jpg

When I was making that knife I myself was very curious what it would turn into at the end. When I finished it I found a light-weight, and surprisingly quick and comfortable in hand, fancy collectable knife.

bubba-san
05-02-09, 11:49 AM
Maxim, you have some well made knives, very good workmanship . Bubba-san

Maxim
05-02-09, 11:58 AM
Maxim, you have some well made knives, very good workmanship . Bubba-san

Thank you. On my web site you can see just a small part of types of knives I ever made. Besides, the knives that might seem to you not well made or poorly designed, they were simply made by requirements my customers insisted on. At least I believe it that way.

jawilliams0425
06-02-09, 09:25 AM
Maxim those are some beautiful blades. Best of luck,

Jim