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View Full Version : Connecting hydraulic powerpacks to increase flow rate.



imagedude
19-02-08, 05:26 AM
Is it possible to join 2 identical powerpacks together to increase flow rate?

ZDP-189
19-02-08, 05:52 AM
I know next to nothing of hydraulics.

But in terms of physics, a parallel arrangement would give more fluid output at a given back pressure. If they were both flowing into one outlet in a Y-connector and the system components were not over pressure, then the flow would then be the aggregate direct output flow of each power pack times the cross sectional reduction ratio given by the driver piston diameter over the power pack piston. Less also any adjustments for viscosity.

MushiSushi
19-02-08, 07:41 AM
I don't know ...



but I know a man who does ;)

MushiSushi
19-02-08, 11:15 AM
if they are in sequence, then No

if they are parallel, then Yes, depending upon the capacity of the connection that they both go in to

John N
19-02-08, 10:08 PM
what they said - IE your not really connecting them together, but having them both pumping into the same system = double the flow rate (but the same tonnage, as that it dictated by PSI & cylinder dia - obviously)

Im not to great on hydraulics but ive often wondered why the home press builders dont have a decent sized accumulator in the system - it would make the press control a lot more 'progressive' (rather than the screaming banshee down / up nothing inbetween control some of them have) - heck, I should probably stick to hammers :rolleyes:

imagedude
19-02-08, 11:20 PM
Im not to great on hydraulics but ive often wondered why the home press builders dont have a decent sized accumulator in the system - :

Cuz they're often large and expensive.

John N
19-02-08, 11:28 PM
Cuz they're often large and expensive.

they come in all sizes and are not that expensive compared to pumps and rams.

imagedude
19-02-08, 11:44 PM
they come in all sizes and are not that expensive compared to pumps and rams.

How much? And how do you plumb them in?

John N
19-02-08, 11:54 PM
think of them as a battery / energy store - after the pump with a non return valve pump side, but before your control valves.

Not sure on the cost but ive had a few re-bagged by hebble hydraulics in huddersfield at a very reasonable price ( complete overhaul inc test certs for 300 ish, for ones the size of oxy cylinders ) - I think they sell them.

It will take the strain off your pump (ie it can be charging the cylinder when your not forging) and allow much better / smoother control of the press.

MushiSushi
20-02-08, 12:04 AM
How much? And how do you plumb them in?

got a few spares in the cellar ;) ;)

imagedude
20-02-08, 12:05 AM
Wouldn't it involve fitting sensors to stop the pump once at max pressure or is there a mechanical bypass system?

MushiSushi
20-02-08, 12:11 AM
I'd have to check with the man, but I believe the limitations of the power unit and the resevoir would define the maximum pressure

or if the power unit is capable of more pressure than the resevoir, then expect a leak ;)

John N
20-02-08, 12:27 AM
pumps usually have a pressure switch - (like you set your air compressor to stop at 100 psi or whatever)

(or a return to tank bypass)

imagedude
20-02-08, 12:31 AM
And if they don't? Mine's just a motor bolted to a pump, no switches or valves.

John N
20-02-08, 12:40 AM
well your gonna have to put a control valve in to control the cylinder. You will have your cylinder return back to tank.

I'ld just put a pressure valve in the line before the control valve set at xyz psi that just lets the oil back to the tank ( 'T' eeed off from the main line )

Im not to shed hot on hydraulics though. Why not get hold of the eurohydraulics catalogue ? - all the bits in there will let you build owt.

Its one of those generic catalogues that loads of differnnt companies put a cover on - ill looksy tomorrow who the parent company is for ya