• Belt pouch by box construction - Tutorial

    So, having been asked to do a WIP on a simple leather belt pouch, I spent this evening with camera peering at me as i worked....
    Now folks, this is just my take on it, I am completly self taught as far as leatherwork is concerned but I have been doing it as a hobby on and off for about 15 years now. This is the methodology that works for me.
    If I am starting a prototype, I will usually play with graph paper first and design by drawing.




    This particular pouch is for a 2oz tobacco tin based survival kit. So first we need the dimensions of the tin, in this case 110mmx80mmx25mm. This gives us the basis for the front of the pouch, though we have to add a bit for stitching, 5mm per side. We also dont want the tin to be too tight in the pouch, so lets go for 90mm wide and 110mm tall. This should put the tin poking out very slightly from the top - gives us something to grab hold of. The side tabs also need a stitch allowance so we make those 30mm. The base must match so that also is set at 30mm. The back matches the front so we know that size too. Now the flap. We know the length of the top of the flap, 30mm, but we want the width a bit wider than the pouch so there is a nice overlap so add another 5mm each side, continuing to the front flap. The front flap can be any length you want but I like the rule of thirds and curves, so I made it about two thirds of the length and nicely curved. Then little details are added such as radiusing the back corners of the flap, just as finishing touches.


    When I am happy with the design I transfer it to thick card or mount board if I want a more permanent pattern.



    This is then cut out and any fold lines are scored to aid folding.




    If at this stage it all appears to work and looks they way you expect then the pattern can be transferred to the leather, flesh side so any mistakes with the pen dont show, and cut out. I have also punched the holes for the popper, and prepared a strip for the belt loop.

    [/QUOTE]

    Quote Originally Posted by bardster View Post
    To help the leather fold in the right place and have the corners look crisp, there are a couple of options. a 'V' gouge works very well, but in this case I thought the leather a little thin, so I used a heated creaser on the flesh side.



    The next stage was to mark the stitch holes for the belt loop and for this I used a stitching chisel.



    Because this is a box pouch, we want the edges to meet at 45 degrees so we bevel all the edges that will be joined. On thicker leather I would use a french edge skiving tool, but in this case a standard no 3 beveler does the job.



    All exposed edges are then slicked and burnished with gum tragacanth



    Then, using a stitch marking wheel and awl, all of the stitch holes are marked and made. I havn't used a stitch groover for this project as we will be using a decorative surface stitch.



    Quote Originally Posted by bardster View Post
    At this stage all the preperation is done so we can now colour the leather, I chose to do this one in black - bit of a mistake really as it made the pictures less clear
    I have started using the eco-flo pro water stains and am having very good results with them.



    The stain is applied to a sponge and rubbed into the leather untill its fully absorbed.





    Once the dye has fully dried, I then seal the leather. I use various products depending on application but in this case chose to use snoseal, I like that it is beeswax based and it does a really nice job and isn't too shiny.

    Quote Originally Posted by bardster View Post
    Now we have our pieces coloured we are ready to start assembling.



    First we have to sew on the belt loop, and fit the hardware, in this case a popper. We do it now as if left till after sewing up the main pouch we wont have access to the inside







    Quote Originally Posted by bardster View Post
    There are numerous ways of sewing the sides of the main pouch, this project started as an experiment of the different methods. I have used lace as well as thread and different styles of stitch. What seems to work best so far is a simple cross stitch. So starting at the bottom I comence stitching using two needles.





    Once I have completed one side of the base I then do the other before going up the side, as it gets tricky to sew the second base if one side is fully closed.





    Once thats done I then complete the first side, with a final loop stitch at the top,



    and then the second side of stitching.
    [QUOTE=bardster;2075614]and a final buff with a soft cloth and its done.









    And a final group shot, thanks for looking.
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Belt pouch by box construction - WIP started by bardster View original post
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