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  1. #1
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    Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Outfitting the Land Rover Defender 90 for Wild Camping.

    Part1: The "Cook Partner" expedition double burner stove from Partner Steel.



    Some background...
    My interests in camping have been moving away from the "hump it in a bag on your back" to "hump it in a large four wheel drive vehicle" for a while now. I suppose it's an age thing. I remember when I hit 30, the slight sense of relief that I was now allowed to be boring and not to go out on a Friday night. It's with a similar sense of relief with 45 looming, that I feel I am now allowed to drive my Land Rover to my chosen campsite and live with significant decadence out of the back of it. No more sore shoulders and mile after mile of staring at my feet. Truth be told, I havent trudged more than a mile or two for some time now, so I've come to the quite firm conclusion, that I am a "car-camper". There, I've said it.

    However, being a car-camper doesnt necessarily limit you to the dubious pleasures of the Caravan and Camping Club. Granted, there are occasions when "approved" camping sites must be used out of necessity, but it's possible to plan a trip to keep that to a minimum and still enjoy all the fun of wild camping. In fact, if your chosen "car" is a Land Rover Defender, or some other such capable offroad vehicle, the places you cant get to, are usually limited by law rather than physical access.

    My pack mule...


    In fact, once you have come to terms with being attached to a vehicle, a whole new host of opportunities just open up. Combining wild camping with offroading, or just using the vehicle to access a huge number and variety of places that would otherwise be impossible to see in a limited time. Dont forget, you are still allowed to go for "walks" if you are so inclined, but the versatility, decadence and fun that this type of camping offers, is hard to beat. But then you realise that with this shift in focus away from backpacking, your equipment needs to change too. Or at least it can change. Rather than just take those few heavy things you would normally leave behind, why not carry things that make your whole experience more comfortable? This change in focus with my kit, has opened up a lot of new possibilities, new tents, new sleeping systems, new cooking systems etc. The downside is most of them are often quite expensive.

    I suppose the obvious thought is to convert the Defender into a full-time expedition vehicle. Such modifications and customisations are common place. However, there are a few negatives to this approach. Firstly, such customisations - adding showers, fridges, water tanks etc - add massively to the gross vehicle weight, which in turn, adds massively to the fuel consumption and can turn a nimble Defender 90 into a lumbering donkey. In addition, my Defender needs to earn a living doing other things, so turning it into a full time toy just isn't an option. So my vehicle needs to remain a box on wheels - a four-wheel-drive van.

    This dictates the kind of things you can do, but ironically, I have found this to be liberating, rather than limiting. With fully modded vehicles, you are locked into them. You have to camp in, with or directly next to them. When using the vehicle as a simple van, you have the freedom to move your kit independently.

    So my mission, is to create the best modular, portable camping setup that I can afford, suitable for transport in the back of a Defender 90.

    Boxes or bags?
    My first schoolboy error when camping out of the Defender, was to just throw everything in the back. It kind of works up to a point - in so far as it'll be a functional camping trip, but this chaotic approach means I ended up taking far too much of things I didn't need and not enough of what I wanted. The Defender is a lot bigger than a rucksack, but it's not a tardis, you have to organise and rationalise the space in exactly the same way that you would a rucksack, just on a bigger scale.

    Bags are good, they conform to awkward shaped spaces and can scrunch down, they are easy to carry and generally light. But also they are not the best things for keeping stuff in order.

    Boxes are great for organisation, for sorting and storing things, but an empty box occupies the same space as a full one and you cant snug a box into a tight space. If the space is too small, you have to get a smaller box.

    The answer is to carry everything in a combination of boxes, containers and bags - a modular system that can be adapted, modified, swapped to different vehicles, used in trailers or whatever. That may sound obvious to some, but for me, the epiphany was realising I needed to organise my gear around the containers and not the other way round. Each module needs to be self contained and complete of purpose and it needs to fit inside a specific container chosen for the job.

    The kitchen.
    I love food and I like cooking. Litte lightweight stoves are a necessary evil for backpacking, but if you are using a vehicle, you can properly rack up a gourmet kitchen. I know some people will say "just build a fire", but that is not always an option, some campsites dont even allow BBQ's and even if you do have a fire, a good kitchen setup will still add to the pleasure of cooking.

    I'm not sure of the origin of the term "wannigan" but when I use it, I'm talking about a box with a complete camp kitchen inside. So the hunt was on for a suitable box. I have used plastic boxes before with mixed results - they are usually cheap and easy to find, but they are often odd shapes and flimsy. I had thought of a fishing tackle box, but then I thought, do it right! The aluminium Zarges boxes from Germany are pretty much industry standard in small package crates. They are extremely robust and very light - the aluminium equivalent of a Pelican box with a price tag just as astounding. They do appear on ebay occasionally and that's where I found mine. I now have 3 of the K470 series, each one with a specific purpose.

    So my starting point for my wannigan, is a single K470 Zarges box, now I just need everything else to put inside it, most importantly, the stove.

    Fuel.
    Before going stove shopping, I need to decide if I want liquid or gas fuel? You probably guessed by now that I've chosen gas, but not necessarily because I think it's the best. You have to choose what fuel is right for your circumstances. For the majority of the places I will be going, bulk liquid propane bottles are commonly available, so it just becomes a matter of what I think is most convenient. While liquid paraffin (kero/kerosene) stoves are often fun to use, pumping away on a little plunger for every brewup is going to get old, quickly. In some parts of the world, LPG is not available, so you have no choice but to use paraffin. In fact paraffin fuelled cooking systems are more economical in terms of burn time, space occupied by the fuel and weight, so if you are very serious about going a very long way from home for a very long time, paraffin must be considered in preference to gas. That's not me, I'm going for the clean, easy and convenient option. When you are camping, simple things can become a huge chore. I dont want cooking and brewing up to be a chore, I want it to be a pleasure. It's supposed to be fun after all. So it's gas for me and as small cannisters are too fiddly, frugal and expensive, it's bulk LPG. With that in mind, I made my next purchase, a 6kg bottle of Calor Lite. I now have my wannigan and my fuel...



    These new Calor Lite bottles are pretty cool, aside from being half the tare (empty) weight of the old bottles, they now have a pressure gague to indicate how much you have left...



    Incidentally, 6kg of propane should yield roughly 28 hours of continual burn on a 10,000 BTU burner, or an hour a day for 28 days. That should be plenty. If I need more than that in one go, I probably should be using paraffin.

    Time to go stove shopping.
    δxδp≥h/4π

  2. #2
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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    The Stove.

    So I've decided on LPG and a Zarges box, my choice of stove is now limited to something that burns LPG and something that fits into a Zarges. I had been using one of these...



    Plenty of em on ebay, it's actually a pretty decent double burner. The only negatives are that it's a bit heavy (all steel & cast iron), no windshield and it's a bit too big for the Zarges box. After using it though, I knew I wanted a double burner. Even cooking for just myself is so much better with 2 gas rings available. I started looking around at various expedition sites and camping portals for quality double burner LPG stoves and one name kept appearing - Partner Steel. Their speciality is really outfitting stoves for the whitewater rafters and the ilk, but their products often appear in commercial expedition trailers such as the...

    Renegade Ridge Horizon Trailer...


    Campa USA DRS Trailer...


    OK, so now my curiosity is piqued. If the whitewater rafters and expedition trailer makers are using these stoves, they must know something, so I started to look into it. First thing I noticed was that they are not available in the UK, which means an import if I want one. Not deterred, I continued my investigation and found that these stoves get pretty much rave reviews everywhere - for a few main reasons. They are comparatively light, they are very well made, they are very simple, they are very serviceable and they are very efficient. I'm sold, I want one. So I contacted Partner Steel and a couple of weeks later, my stove arrived.

    Here are my thoughts...

    Out of the box.
    The first thing I noticed on unpacking the stove, was how light it was compared to my other dual burner, no surprise as it's aluminium compared to steel and cast iron. The second thing I noticed was the simple construction, it's basically just two burners welded onto a heavy gauge stainless steel wire grill and mounted into a welded aluminium box. Brilliant, I love simple. Simple means mend-able and that means a long life. The next thing I noticed, was how beautifully made it is, the welds are perfect - good job whoever did that. The stove came with a regulator (which amazingly fits the Calor bottle) pressure hose and stove connector.



    The construction is a combination of weld and rivet, but note the rivets are "real" rivets, not pop rivets. The hinges are heavy duty full length piano hinges...



    On opening the stove, you are treated to gleaming aluminium, perfect welds, simple burners and a heavy gauge grill. The grill and burner assembly just lifts out to give you access to the inside for cleaning and to the gas jets should you need to effect a repair. The windshield folds flat into the lid.





    God is in the details as they say. The control knobs are recessed to prevent damage...



    ...as is the gas line connector. Small irritation here, I would like to have been provided with dust caps for these connectors, plastic would do, brass would be nicer. Particularly, the connector on the gas line has a small needle valve which protrudes, you can see it in the picture (it's purpose is a safety mechanism in case you accidentally disconnect the stove without turning off the gas bottle first). I can see this getting bent or broken in transit, which would effectively kill the stove stone dead. A little protector cap would cost pennies and would be a nice touch. It's odd that the knobs should be recessed for protection in transit, but that needle valve is left protruding. I should say that the hose and connector came inside the stove case and I think that is how it's supposed to be carried, which would protect the hose, valve and regulator.



    The windshield supports are a minor annoyance too. Again, the idea is for them to be super-simple and therefore repairable. I can see that, but I'm not sure it's the best possible design. The support arms are just two bent lengths of wire, which fold back into the case...



    They fold out to 90 degrees to the case and locate into a small hole in the windshield. This leaves a bit of wire sticking out which I think is a bit of a snag hazard, which I'd rather not see - especially on a stove that might have boiling liquids on it. They also rattle a bit and I hate rattles.



    Again, the idea is to allow the wings of the windshield to be splayed out to accommodate different sized pots. A good idea, but possibly a bit unnecessary and as you can see in the pic below, those wire support arms do stick out somewhat. I may have to mod those in the fullness of time, I'll have to see what I can think of or maybe they wont annoy me in practice, we'll see.



    A beautifully made stove. Simple, robust construction, handmade by someone who obviously takes pride in their work. I love it!

    Kettles boiled!



    A big thanks to Bill at Partner Steel for giving me the opportunity to import one of these.

    Stove tech-specs:
    Capacity: 2 Individually Controlled Burners.
    Cooking Surface: 12.5" x 18.5".
    Closed Case Size: 3.75" x 12.5" x 18.5".
    Total BTUs: 20,000 (10,000 BTUs per burner).
    Total Weight: 13 lbs.
    Material: 5052 grade aluminium case with 5/16 diameter 304 grade stainless steel grill.
    Construction: Hand welds and aircraft rivets.

    Website: http://www.partnersteel.com/
    δxδp≥h/4π

  3. #3
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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Expansion.
    I mentioned earlier how much value I've placed on the kit being modular. I think that's worth going into a bit more detail. I have a kind of core component of the kit, which is the wannigan, containing stove, regulator and hose, nesting pan set, cutlery, mugs, tea and coffee kit, salt, pepper & spices, lifesaver water bottle, cutting mats, small bottle of washing up liquid, collapsible bowl and a tupperware box of food to last 2 people 24 hours. So the wannigan, plus the LPG bottle is everything I need for an overnight somewhere. But it's limited in terms of food storage for longer trips. This is where you can add components to extend the time out.

    More Containers.
    I have a 10 litre yatchsmans tub which I bought recently and is ideal for rice, beans, lentils, noodles, pasta, cous-cous, flour, salt, sugar, dried coconut, dried egg, whole milk powder, coffee, tea and hot chocolate powder. I've also got two large tupperware boxes which occupy half a second Zarges box and can be used for cooked meats, fresh meats, tinned meats, fresh veg and and dairy.

    So it's pretty easy to expand the original setup into something much more comprehensive for longer trips. The second Zarges box also provides another sizeable lump of work surface real-estate that is so valuable when out. A chopping mat and you have a hygienic kitchen worktop. The Zarges also serve as a workbench or occasional tables for your bedside or next to your chairs - brilliant.

    Here's some fella using a Zarges as a workbench in the jungle to sharpen his knife...



    They make a good spare camp stool too. Zarges are not the only option, but whatever box you go for, pick one that is well made, waterproof, airtight, stackable, lockable, flat-topped and sturdy enough to stand or sit on.



    Cool Box.
    A good cool box is worth considering and if you can get an unused one, a British Army "Norwegian" hot/cold box is well worth the money. These things are built like a battleship. They will keep frozen food frozen for 3 to 5 days and cool and fresh for at least a week. Good for keeping beer cold, or just filling with ice. But they are heat proof, they can also be used for keeping hot things hot for a long time. That's more useful than it sounds. They have a big spring clamp on the lid which keeps em water/air tight and are designed to also carry and dispense boiling liquids. The British Army use em to fill with soup, tea and coffee and then transport it in bulk out to the lads. The lids of the Norwegian even have a tap for this purpose.





    I like coffee, but I dont have much need for 20 litres of the stuff, but I probably would have a use for 20 litres of hot running water. Fill a Norwegian full of boiling water and Ill have it literally on tap for a couple of days. Bit of an extravagance perhaps and boiling 20 litres of water is going to have a hit on the LPG store, but if you have 6kg and are only going for a week, why not? Or just use a fire to boil the water, that doesnt cost anything. But if all else fails, I can always use it as a handy kitchen stool.

    Lighting.
    Lighting for the kitchen is provided by one of two army surplus Vapalux M320 paraffin lanterns. These two lanterns, plus 10 litres of fuel will provide 60 watts of light for around 100 hours at a cost of about 12p an hour, or I can run them both together for 120 watts of light, for 7 hours a night, for a week. That's pretty extravagant, but it makes for a very nice ambience ...and each lantern puts out around 1 kilowatt of heat. That will really warm up a tipi on a frosty night and keep the mildew at bay. Some people dont like to take 2 types of fuel (3 if you count diesel), but it does make sense. The paraffin is also fuel for the backup stove - an Optimus 111C which permanently lives in the drivers seat box in my Landy. If something happened to the LPG stove, I've still got a sturdy 10,000 BTU burner and enough fuel for around 40 hours of use. Hopefully, the Optimus wont be needed and I can use all the paraffin for the lanterns, but the option is there.

    I've done one of those numbered picture thingy's to show what's what, not that it's needed, but I was bored...


    1. Calor Lite 6kg propane cylinder.
    2. Cook Partner stove from Partner steel.
    3. Zarges K470 aluminium "wannigan".
      stove
      regulator and hose
      nesting pan set
      kettle
      cutlery
      mugs
      tea and coffee kit
      salt, pepper & spices
      lifesaver water bottle
      cutting mats
      small bottle of washing up liquid
      collapsible bowl
      tupperware box of dehydrated rations, to last 2 people 24 hours.
    4. Vapalux M320 paraffin lantern.
    5. 10 Litre Yatchsmans tub.
      rice
      beans
      lentils
      noodles
      pasta
      cous-cous
      flour
      salt
      sugar
      dried coconut
      dried egg
      whole milk powder
      coffee
      tea
      hot chocolate powder.
    6. Lifesaver water purifying bottle.
    7. Zarges K470 aluminium food box.
      cooked meats
      fresh meats
      salami
      tinned meats
      fresh veg
      eggs
      cheese
      fresh milk
      porrige & museli
    8. British Army "Norwegian" hot & cold box.


    Packs down pretty small too. I think this represents about 25% of the available space in the back of my Defender.



    That's quite a lot and the kitchen/food component is definitely the biggest single component. In the remaining 75% I have to fit 2 lots of clothes, 2 sleeping bags, 2 mattresses, 2 camp chairs, another lantern, water carrier, fuel (paraffin and extra diesel), tools, spares, offroad gear, toiletries, a peli-box of sundry items and my tent.
    δxδp≥h/4π

  4. #4
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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Very interesting post Martin. Thanks for taking the time to write it for us.
    I used to do some camping in strange places out of the back of my two Land Rovers.
    Looking forwards to the rest of the series.

    Geoff
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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    That's an interesting article mate, it's always nice to see the thought process behind a decision as well as the eventual item being tested.

    Shame you don't like the wire bits, that's one of my favourite design ideas, just as much as is needed to do the job.
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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Very concise and well written review Martyn.
    Looks to be a nice piece of gear, one question though.
    When does the comfort level of Landy camping reach a level where you are no longer slimming it?
    You seem to be just about there
    My biggest fear in life is that when I die my wife sells all my stuff for what I told her I paid for it!!

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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    cool stove set-up - but the $64000 question - how much?
    If you love something, set it free.
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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Nice stove.

    Your 28 days of burn should be an underestimate. I used to live on a boat and used 9Kg cylinders for the cooker, which was a commercial-sized job. 2 cylinders lasted about 3 months, that's for a family of 4, sometimes using the humungous oven (large enough for 4 pizzas on one shelf).

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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    I like shiny. But I bet it wont be like that for long.

  10. #10
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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Quote Originally Posted by geoff88 View Post
    Very interesting post Martin. Thanks for taking the time to write it for us.
    I used to do some camping in strange places out of the back of my two Land Rovers.
    Looking forwards to the rest of the series.

    Geoff
    Welcome Goeff, it's turned into more of a blog post than a review, but it was fun to write and it helps fire my imagination. It might do the same for someone else planning a similar thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ropeman View Post
    That's an interesting article mate, it's always nice to see the thought process behind a decision as well as the eventual item being tested.

    Shame you don't like the wire bits, that's one of my favourite design ideas, just as much as is needed to do the job.
    I think the rationale is probably more relevant than the actual cooker I picked. There are plenty of options for what cooker and to be honest, any one of em might fit the brief. The epiphany for me was realising that I need to treat the back of my Landy like a big rucksack. By that I mean to decide in advance how much weight and space I was going to give over to each element - sleeping, shelter, food, cooking, water, lighting, clothing etc. Once that's done, you can partition the space into boxes and containers for each element and then decide what to use in detail, given the space you have for that element, starting with the least/simplest you need and working from there. Like lighting for example. I know I want to be able to take 2 Vapalux lanterns and 10 litres of paraffin, so that's the maximum space I give over to lighting. I thought at first I was being too fussy, but you would do this for a rucksack - decide what to take, based on need, available space, comfort etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hatethatgiraffe View Post
    Very concise and well written review Martyn.
    Looks to be a nice piece of gear, one question though.
    When does the comfort level of Landy camping reach a level where you are no longer slimming it?
    You seem to be just about there
    Slimming it? I aint slimming mate.
    There is nothing wrong with just throwing your tried and tested backpacking kit into the back and heading off. But it's a bit of a waste of a Landy. Why not make the best of it? Why not make yourself the most comfortable you can be?

    Quote Originally Posted by gorilla View Post
    cool stove set-up - but the $64000 question - how much?
    Ahhh, somewhere between 180 and 220, depending on where you get it from and whether you get hit for import tax - I did.
    δxδp≥h/4π

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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Quote Originally Posted by mrcharly View Post
    Nice stove.

    Your 28 days of burn should be an underestimate. I used to live on a boat and used 9Kg cylinders for the cooker, which was a commercial-sized job. 2 cylinders lasted about 3 months, that's for a family of 4, sometimes using the humungous oven (large enough for 4 pizzas on one shelf).
    Ropey worked it out for me so it could be wrong.

    Seriously, it's untested. The figure of around 28 hours at 10,000 BTUs is based on the calorific value of LPG per Kg of gas and assuming 100% efficiency of the equipment. How long it actually lasts would probably depend on a bazillion things like weather, what you are cooking, how high up you are, if you also have a fire etc. You could probably eek it out to six weeks or blow it all off in a fortnight depending on how you use it. Paraffin is much more space/weight efficient. For the same space and weight penalty of the propane cylinder, I could almost get twice the burn time at the same 10,000 BTUs from paraffin. But that's not too important for me. Once you get to a certain point of having enough fuel to last your trip, it's just about what is easiest and cleanest to use - at least it is for me.
    δxδp≥h/4π

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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    I meant slumming! Bloody iPhone and it's smart ass autocorrect on spelling lol

    You're right though, why waste the space and slum it if you can be as comfortable as possible!
    My biggest fear in life is that when I die my wife sells all my stuff for what I told her I paid for it!!

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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Martyn re the wire stays for the windshield, is it possible to reverse fix the stays to the shield and let any spare wire to pass over the cooker wall to the inside,being at the corners it would unlikely get in the way of a round pan.

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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roth View Post
    Martyn re the wire stays for the windshield, is it possible to reverse fix the stays to the shield and let any spare wire to pass over the cooker wall to the inside,being at the corners it would unlikely get in the way of a round pan.
    It might be possible, but it might compromise how the lid closes. I like the idea though, and it might be possible to figure a workaround. For now though, I think I'm just gonna live with it and see how much of an issue it is. I think it's more of a case of me just being picky.

    Here's a pic of me full camp kitchen. This is everything I would take for an extended trip...

    δxδp≥h/4π

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    Re: Partner Steel "Cook Partner" Expedition Stove Review.

    Quote Originally Posted by Martyn View Post
    Here's a pic of me full camp kitchen. This is everything I would take for an extended trip...

    Quality set up mate, looking good!

    Is it coincidence that the RH Zagres box says BB on it?
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