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  1. #1
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    Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    Hello again.

    I've always used Danish Oil (usually I'd sand the wood, dust then clean it down with white spirits, apply one fairly thick coat, steel wool after two days, dust and clean off with white spirits then finish off with two really fine coats over two days) but I'm going to try BLO on my next hatchet. I've never used this oil before.

    So I'm interested to hear your favourite BLO application method? I see from looking around that there's lots of ways and I'd like to know more about what works best for you like even the number of coats? Browsing around I've spotted people putting it on straight and even mixed with white spirit or paraffin/kerosene. A real appeal is the idea of heating it a bit first as I think that could well help. Have you ever tried doing that?

    All advice and tips welcome....

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    I find it's best to dilute the first coat 50/50 with pure turpentine as it penetrates better. Let the handle sit in it for an hour or so then wipe off any excess and leave overnight to dry. You can then repeat this process but with pure boiled linseed. Personally I prefer danish oil though.

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    A tip you may know, but we all tend to forget simple things - try the new finish on a scrap of wood first

    Yes, heating the wood and / or oil helps it penetrate, at least- it feels like the wood soaks up more oil.

    Otherwise - you can soak it in oil or rub the oil in, I personally see very little difference.

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    Quote Originally Posted by mikew View Post
    I find it's best to dilute the first coat 50/50 with pure turpentine as it penetrates better. Let the handle sit in it for an hour or so then wipe off any excess and leave overnight to dry. You can then repeat this process but with pure boiled linseed. Personally I prefer danish oil though.
    Would Paraffin do the same thing? I have a jar of that here. It may well be a stronger smell but I wouldn't mind that if it had the same result.

    Quote Originally Posted by TM Miller View Post
    A tip you may know, but we all tend to forget simple things - try the new finish on a scrap of wood first

    Yes, heating the wood and / or oil helps it penetrate, at least- it feels like the wood soaks up more oil.

    Otherwise - you can soak it in oil or rub the oil in, I personally see very little difference.
    I'll heat it up, for sure. Warm enough to handle comfortably with gloves. I'm planning to soak the first coat for a while, rather than just apply it, with the entire hatchet submerged in a basin of BLO/possible mix.

    The amount of coats doesn't matter as long as it's not slippery or glossy. I'm looking for either matt or satin with a good grip rather than that. I don't care about the colour it changes to although if it did go a bit darker I'd like that better but it's not much odds as long as the results are as good as possible.

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    No idea about paraffin. Turpentine is cheap and readily available and I can promise you it works well. Ask Bo Bergman if you don't believe me

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    Quote Originally Posted by Eighteen12 View Post
    Would Paraffin do the same thing? I have a jar of that here.

    The amount of coats doesn't matter as long as it's not slippery or glossy. I'm looking for either matt or satin with a good grip rather than that. I don't care about the colour it changes to although if it did go a bit darker I'd like that better but it's not much odds as long as the results are as good as possible.

    No ideas about paraffin, I am using the word in the meaning of wax-like substance, from which candles are made...
    Most probably the colour will change to darker and yellower (warmer)
    The wood will be slippery untill the oil dries completely, of course. Afterwards it will keep the same texture it had originally, just a little-bit harder. If the wood is polished, it will be glossy, if you sand it to more coarse finish, it will remain that way. But you already know all that, since you have used Danish Oil before. They are not very different, I believe

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    BLO 50/50 White spirit here

    Also I don't know if you are aware that linseed oil on a bunched up cloth might burst in to flames in your bin (never seen it myself )

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    You'll have to give BLO longer to dry compared to Danish oil, as there aren't as many (if any) additives.

    Turpentine would work better than paraffin to aid absorption from what I've read elsewhere.

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    A question about finishing the handle after completing the Boiled Linseed Oil work....

    Sometimes, especially after the jar has been opened and closed a few times and the oil is thicker, I find that the Danish Oil can finish off a little too shiny and sealed feeling for my liking as there is a heavier layer. What I would do there is leave it a few days until it's well dried and give it a run with the extra fine steel wool. This removes a little of the glossiness and gives the wood a more natural feel.

    Would BLO need the same thing if it happened to finish like that but would the extra sanding maybe spoil the protection? Do you have any way of finishing off the handle after BLO application? Either with fine sanding or maybe another method like a wax or something similar?

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    Yes you can knock it back with 0000 steel wool. The wood will still be well sealed.

    In my experience you get that slightly sticky, over sealed feeling when you haven't wiped off the excess fully before leaving to dry.

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    Well, I measured the volume I would need by putting the Outdoor Axe & Small Hatchet into the basin and making sure they were well covered. I used 750ml of Boiled Linseed Oil & 750ml of Pure Turpentine and have another 250ml of each mixed up spare as a top-up or I'll use it on an old club hammer later.

    I heated the mix but didn't overdo it. I may have chickened out a bit and could have went warmer but I think it was as hot as I'd like it. It has a very nice smell. The BLO is just the usual putty smell, of course, but it turned really sweet when it was mixed into the Pure Turpentine. When I heated it, I imagined it was a bit like burnt brown sugar. Definitely better than BLO/Paraffin would have been if I'd went for that option.

    It was surprising how the mix got really watery and I can see it soaking in much better than the thicker pure BLO. I think I'll give it a couple of days in the basin with an odd stir and move around. I'm looking for the hickory to be on the darker side if possible so don't mind giving it time to hopefully go that way.

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    Quote Originally Posted by Eighteen12 View Post
    I heated the mix but didn't overdo it. I may have chickened out a bit and could have went warmer but I think it was as hot as I'd like it. It has a very nice smell. .
    I'm not sure, how explosive is vapour of turpentine, but it is allways a good thought to take care, when warming flammable liquids...

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    One day in the soak now and I'm just back in from giving them a good swirl round. I think the grain has risen a bit on them since yesterday evening which is surely a good sign that the mix is working well. One thing I'm certain about, and find funny after all the Internet info and videos saying it'll happen, is that neither one has darkened a bit. Unless that happens later with the Boiled Linseed Oil application on it's own?

    But still, the protection is the main thing. A deepened colour would have been a bonus though...

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    I think the darkening happens over time as some of the components of the linseed oil oxidise (= react with oxygen in the air, for those who wonder what I mean).

    btw If you have any old rags that you have used to wipe off the linseed oil, be careful not to leave them unattended. In time, they can (and will) ignite spontaneously, usually weeks or months after you have forgotten you tossed them in the corner of the garage, workshop etc.

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    Re: Boiled Linseed Oil on handles

    Well, I took the Outdoor Axe & Small Hatchet out yesterday. I expected them to be running and dripping for ages but it was near the opposite. I wiped them down and hung them up. The Small Hatchet dripped out from the head a little bit and the Outdoor Axe did not. Neither wept out from the wood. In fact, I would say if you looked at them a few minutes after I lifted them out of the basin, you'd never have known they were ever in it.

    To be honest, I think it's not half the job of Danish Oil. It just looks like a half-hearted smeared oil on the surface with other parts looking totally matt. Nowhere near the complete finish or classy look of Danish Oil. I am hoping that a few more coats of 100% Boiled Linseed Oil helps bring them up a bit but I can't see it getting much better after all that soaking they've already had.

    I have a Carpenter's Axe in there now before I put the mix away. It might well be a better looking result because the handle is that dark brown Hickory that you get now and again.
    Last edited by Eighteen12; 18-05-17 at 07:09 PM.

 

 

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