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  1. #31
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    bump, still isnt sticky

    thanks for posting this one_rod. very helplful

    what SY cable will i be needing for a 2.2kw motor?
    Last edited by jameswood; 11-09-10 at 04:37 PM. Reason: added question


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  2. #32
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    A 2.2 kW motor will draw less than 10 amps per phase at full load.

    In theory 1.5 mm cable should be ok, provided there is only a short length between the supply and the motor.

    If it was me, I would use 2.5mm. Just to be sure.



    one_rod.
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  3. #33
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    thanks, i've ordered some and some ring terminals


    Jimmy & proud!

  4. #34
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    sticky sticky sticky ,
    who moderates this place ?
    i'll pm em
    please email me if you want to contact me ,my PM box just gets so full .
    owen@owenbush.co.uk

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  5. #35
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    you tell 'em owen !


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  6. #36
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    I thought I would add to this thread rather than start a new one as it will hopefully add to what has already been said.

    I have this inverter http://http://www.teco.co.uk/drivee21.htm and a motor. Can I choose which direction it runs by wiring it differently?

  7. #37
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    Yes.

    When you wire it up, there's a 50/50 chance it'll run the right way. If it doesn't, swapping any two of the three phase connections over, at only one end of the cable between the inverter and motor, will reverse it.

    Usually, it's easier to do at the inverter end, so swapping the wires on T1(U) and T2(V) would do it.

    Obviously you'll need to check the direction of rotation before you fit the belt, or attach anything that will suffer from being run the wrong way.

    The drive itself can reverse rotation, without needing to change the wiring. If you've got a one-way application though, not fitting the reverse switch is safer.

  8. #38
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    Hi folks,

    Just wanted to say this thread was invaluable to me today.

    Got my inverter in the post and largely depended upon the information from this thread to get the thing wired up. It works flawlessly, thanks for the various tips especially to one_rod for his two excellent posts.

  9. #39
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    Now please bear with me if I am being thick here. I can re-wire a house, but get confused by this sort of thing. Am I right in thinking that an Inverter will allow me to to covert a 240V AC supply to a 415V DC supply with 3-phase?

    Mea culpa if I got it wrong, but I would rather find out now than while I "ride the lightning"

  10. #40
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ajayen View Post
    Now please bear with me if I am being thick here. I can re-wire a house, but get confused by this sort of thing. Am I right in thinking that an Inverter will allow me to to covert a 240V AC supply to a 415V DC supply with 3-phase?

    Mea culpa if I got it wrong, but I would rather find out now than while I "ride the lightning"
    No. Inverters with a 240v input will generally convert single phase into 240v 3-phase at a variable frequency.
    It is possible to get a 3-phase transformer to step the output voltage up to 400v, but it's an expensive option. Much better to get a motor that can be set up for 240v supply.

    There's no such thing as a 3-phase DC supply. Think you may be getting your terminology a little confused. If you really do need a DC supply at that voltage then you are into the realm of power rectifiers, and that's a whole other ball game.


    one_rod.
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  11. #41
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    I think he's confusing a DC inverter which converts usually 12V or 24V DC into single phase AC with a 3-phase inverter which converts single phase AC into 3-phase AC
    “I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.”
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  12. #42
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    Just wanted to say this thread was invaluable to me
    +1. Thanks one_rod

  13. #43

    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    Some great advice in this thread.

    A while ago I acquired a 3hp three phase mill and 2hp three phase linisher in the workshops, but only 240v (Albeit dedicated)
    As mentioned in earlier posts, prior to purchase I ensured the motors were dual voltage i.e. operate on 415v or 240v three phase.

    Used 2 x Teco 'advanced' inverters, 240v single to 240v three phase, also a pod (remote control) for the linisher.
    The reason I opted for the advanced unit, is that I have motor speed control from the inverters 'without' losing torque, this is something you may want to factor into the equation when looking for an inverter.


    Hope this helps.
    Tom
    Pro and hobby knife maker supplies at


  14. #44
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    I've just put together a Multitool grinder from Rapidboy and Davidh's group buy thread, using the 3-phase motor and adaptor kit (thanks guys). I already had a suitable inverter.

    OneRod's sticky covers most of it better than I can, but someone was asking about remote control of the inverter. As I needed to put boxes together for mine, I thought I'd do a show-and-tell.

    I'd mounted the inverter itself, a 2.2 kW/3HP Altivar 11, in an IP65 enclosure. It's going to be running a grinder, so needs to be dust-proof. The inverter itself generates a certain amount of heat and there are formulae for calculating the minimum size of enclosure needed to dissipate the heat. Going through the calculation tends to show you need an enormous enclosure, based on the need to ensure that the inverter doesn't shut down, ever, under full load, on a hot day, when running continuously. I used a much smaller enclosure, reasoning that I'd be running much less than a 100% duty cycle and that I can just wait for things to cool down if the internal overtemperature shutdown stops the inverter. My enclosure is 300mm W x 400mm H x 200 mm D. I've not mounted it on the wall yet, but when I do, it'll be spaced off the wall to allow air to flow up the back as well as the front and sides. I've fitted a 3-phase socket on the output, so that I can use the same inverter for different motors/machines.





    The remote control box is on a long cable so it can be positioned appropriately on the machine that is in use. I'm intending to mount it with Velcro.

    The housing for my remote box is an SA110-40SL from Lamonde http://www.lamondeautomation.co.uk/a...nclosures.html

    And I've got one of their potentiometers http://www.lamondeautomation.co.uk/a...tiometers.html

    The Lamonde potentiometer was something I'd salvaged at work. In the past I've used 10-turn linear pots because the price was right, but single turn ones are better; I've found the twiddling gets tedious on a 10-turn. They must be linear, not logarithmic. Logarithmic pots are often used in audio applications, so check if buying on ebay, etc. The Lamonde one is nice in that it fits the standard pushbutton hole and has screw terminals, but it's pricy.

    The rest of the switches and stuff came from Chalon Components https://sslrelay.com/chaloncomponent...aram=cid%3D%26

    Chalon also have an ebay shop.

    I have a red projecting stop button CB2-BL4C, with a Normally-Closed contact block and mounting collar CB2-BZ102, green flush start button CB2-BA31, the potentiometer mentioned above and a keyed switch for forward/reverse, made up of CB2-BG2 and CB2-BZ105.

    The idea is that I have start, stop, speed and reverse. The reverse is selected by the keyswitch which only has the key removable in the forward position. If I'm using a machine that doesn't need to reverse, I can take the key out to disable the reverse.

    The box for the drive itself, mentioned earlier, is an EKO030420 and I've used a GW62228 socket for the output, with a GW60027 plug on each machine it might run. There's an error in the GW60027 description on the list page, where it shows 2p + E. It shows 3P + E on its own page.

    In accordance with the law of sod, once I'd put together the remote box, I found three unused junction boxes and my stash of 10-turn pots. There seemed to be no excuse for not assembling them with the appropriate switches.

    Wiring Diagram:



    I've used a few different Variable Frequency Drives over the years, and they are all different. However, as far as I can tell, all the VFDs I have used have been able to work with this design of remote control box.



    It is a relatively safe control configuration. Instead of using a run/stop switch that can be left in the “run” position, it provides the same functionality as a conventional No-Volt Release circuit. After interrupting and restoring power, the drive will not start until the start button is pressed.

    The start button is flush with the bezel and needs to be pushed below the level of the bezel with a finger, or finger like object, to start. The stop button is projecting and can be operated with a flat object like an open, gloved, palm.

    The keyswitch makes it easy to disable the reverse run facility when running machines which do not need to be able to run in reverse and/or might be dangerous if they did so.

    Reverse Disabled



    Apart from the box, switches and potentiometer, the other components are the cable, cable gland and some solder.

    Tools needed are a soldering iron, screwdrivers and a means of cutting the correct-sized holes in the box.

    I used holesaws for the 22mm pushbutton and keyswitch holes, a 16mm holesaw for the cable gland, and 10mm and 3.3mm drills to mount the potentiometer. I already had the tools.

    The potentiometer knobs on the non-Lamonde multi-turn Pots have Allen-keyed grub screws to lock them in place. Needless to say, I didn't have the correct Allen key and wasted half a day tracking one down.

    The cable I used was the first thing I found that seemed suitable. 7 cores are needed to wire up the box and the control signals are low-voltage DC, so the cable doesn't need to be anything fancy. I was looking for something around 0.5 mm2 and with multi-stranded cores. In the end, I found a part-reel of 10-core, 24AWG screened cable that looked good enough. The cores were smaller than I'd wanted at about 0.2 mm2, but they were multi-stranded. Solid conductors are not good when there is movement involved, hence my desire for multi-stranded conductors.



    I tinned the ends of the cores with solder before connecting them. In the case of the soldered connections to the potentiometer, it makes soldering to the tags easier. It also keeps the strands together and seems to give better bite in the screwed terminals on the switches.

    Crimped bootlace ferrules are the approved method, but I didn't have them handy, or the crimping tool.

    At the inverter end, I had a couple of different types of terminals to connect to, on different inverters. One of them uses spring clamps and I've always found that these seem to work best on soldered ends.

    The wire colours for connection to the inverter are;
    Black +ve end of potentiometer
    White -ve end of potentiometer
    Yellow potentiometer wiper (speed setpoint input)
    Brown Common for digital inputs
    Red Stop. Sometimes called "run enable" or similar. Breaking this input stops the drive.
    Green Forward start
    Orange Reverse start

    The blue and purple wires in the photo are the cut-off ends of unused cores that I used because I had them. Their colour has no significance.

    When connecting the potentiometer, it's important that you get the wiper in the right terminal. Set the potentiometer to it's mid position and start the drive. Turn the potentiometer and see if the speed behaves as expected. If it doesn't and it's action is reversed, swap the potentiometer end connections round (Black and White on my wiring).

    I prefer the single-turn pots and it's much easier to use the Lamonde box and pot, as seen in the first 2 photos. The 22mm holes are already in and there are 20mm knockouts for the cable gland. Because it doesn't need odd sized holes cutting, it may be the cheaper option if you've not got the tools already,

    Quote Originally Posted by loneronin View Post
    I finally buy the inverter (mitsubishi fr-s500) and I use this guide to wire it. everthing went well. it's simple and complete.
    IMO would be great to add something about the remote controllers (on/off switch, speed up/down potenziometer, run direction,...).
    Only a little over a year since Loneronin asked, but you can't rush these things.....

  15. #45
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    Re: How to wire up an inverter. Properly.

    Great stuff, it makes me want to go out and wire one up now.... shame i haven't got one.

    Very methodical and clear.

 

 

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